The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

FCTC: Action Now! Campaign

"Full implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control would bring the single biggest blow to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and respiratory disease."

- WHO Director-General Margaret Chan at the NCD Summit in New York, 19 Sept. 2011

WHO Director-General Margaret ChanChallenges to the effective implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) – including lack of political will, funding and capacity for tobacco control in low-resource countries – are undermining the success of the tobacco control movement to date.

In 2014, UN member states renewed their commitment to accelerate implementation of the FCTC. In this campaign, FCA is working to turn that pledge into reality at three levels: country level; FCTC Conference of the Parties (COP); and during various international health and development events.

In 2015 we had a number of notable successes. They include having tobacco control included in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), endorsed by the member states of the United Nations.

Read more about FCTC: Action Now!

 

Fight against NCDs endorsed in global development agenda!

New goals for global sustainable development were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on Friday, including the fight against non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets that form the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will drive the world’s efforts to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice, improve health and wellbeing, and protect our planet over the next 15 years.

To measure SDGs’ progress, UN should track tobacco affordability

 

As the United Nations (UN) tracks progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) over the next 15 years, it will monitor countries’ efforts to implement the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC)*.

WHO should look into FCTC’s lessons learned on financing and taxes

 
Five years since the first United Nations Summit on non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the lack of resources is undermining progress against the world’s number one killer diseases*.