The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

FCA Campaigns: Illicit Trade

romanian border police 200pRomanian border police crack down on illegal cigarettes coming into the country (c) FCAIllicit trade in tobacco products is a huge global problem that affects public health, and threatens law and order. Global effort is essential in eliminating this trade, as well as to control supply and distribution chains and implement effective enforcement strategies.

The tobacco industry benefits from illicit trade. Tobacco consumption increases due to the availability of cheaper products, and governments delay raising tobacco taxes because they're worried about increased smuggling.

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Illicit Trade Campaign News

No evidence that tobacco control increased illicit trade in Latin America

By Eduardo Bianco* and Dardo Curti **

Tobacco control has progressed rapidly in Latin American (LA) countries in the last 10 years, but tobacco taxation policies have lagged.

Industry-INTERPOL deal signals challenges to illicit trade protocol

A recent agreement between tobacco industry giants and the world’s largest police organisation, INTERPOL, illustrates Big Tobacco’s zeal to manipulate the recently adopted protocol on illicit tobacco products.

In November 2012, Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) adopted the protocol in order to combat the illegal trade in tobacco. At the heart of the ITP is a ‘tracking and tracing’ system for monitoring tobacco products from production to sales.

Tracking Illicit Trade in Southeast Asia

The trade in illicit cigarettes in Southeast Asia puts populations at risk for greater smoking.

A collaborative partnership among Duke University’s Program on Global Health and Technology Access, the Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance and the American Cancer Society engaged investigators in the region in taking measure of illicit trade in tobacco using a common methodology.