The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

Media Releases

Nations can save lives and cut losses of billions of US dollars by deciding this week to work on a new international treaty to combat global trade in illicit tobacco products

This week at a global health conference, health advocates are urging governments to start negotiations on a new international treaty to combat illicit trade in tobacco products. 

Representatives of 147 countries are meeting at a global health conference in Bangkok June 30-July 6 2007 to implement the international tobacco control treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization (FCTC). One of the main agenda items of the conference will be the discussion of an expert report on combating the illicit tobacco trade.

Corporate Accountability International Urges Nations of World Health Assembly to Prioritize People's Lives over Corporate Profits

United Nations' Millennium Development Goals Cited as Baseline for Achieving Global Health Standards - A Statement from Corporate Accountability International Executive Director Kathryn Mulvey.
 
"The Millennium Development Goals provide a baseline for achieving global health standards. The goal related to the trade and financial system will have significant bearing on achievement of the other Millennium Development Goals, in particular the reduction of extreme poverty and hunger, ensuring environmental sustainability, and increasing sustainable access to safe drinking water.

The Illicit Trade in Tobacco - How international cooperation can save lives and billions of dollars

 

 

Tobacco kills more people than AIDS, other legal and illegal drugs, road accidents, murder and suicide combined[1].  Currently around five million people worldwide die each year from tobacco-related causes, including cancer, heart disease and respiratory Diseases [2] [3]. In comparison, HIV/AIDS is responsible for three million deaths each year.

Nations from the Region of the Americas Collaborate to Save Lives and Reduce Economic Losses by Cracking Down on Illicit Trade

MONTEVIDEO, URUGUAY  Representatives from 35 countries are gathering in Montevideo, Uruguay on December 5, 2007 to work on knowledge-gathering and skill-sharing on the illicit trade of tobacco  a global crime that contributes to higher rates of tobacco-related disease and death, helps finance criminal and terrorist groups, and robs governments of $US billions in revenue. 

Nations to Launch Negotiations on Treaty to Combat Illicit Tobacco Trade

 

Download media release: Nations to Launch Negotiations on Treaty to Combat Illicit Tobacco Trade [Adobe Acrobat PDF - 46.14 KB]

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND – On February 11, representatives from more than 150 countries will begin negotiations here on an historic international treaty to combat illicit trade in tobacco products – a massive global problem that undermines efforts to reduce tobacco use and save lives, helps fund organized crime and terrorist organizations, and costs governments billions in revenue.

Corporate Accountability International Urges Nations of World Health Assembly to Prioritize Peoples Lives over Corporate Profits

United Nations' Millennium Development Goals Cited as Baseline for Achieving Global Health Standards - A Statement from Corporate Accountability International Executive Director Kathryn Mulvey

 "The Millennium Development Goals provide a baseline for achieving global health standards. The goal related to the trade and financial system will have significant bearing on achievement of the other Millennium Development Goals, in particular the reduction of extreme poverty and hunger, ensuring environmental sustainability, and increasing sustainable access to safe drinking water.

Nations at International Tobacco Control Conference Seize Opportunity to Protect People from Second

Bangkok – Nations attending a conference of the World Health Organization tobacco control treaty today unanimously recommended the adoption of guidelines that will help governments adopt stringent smokefree laws. It is expected that the full conference will quickly approve the guidelines, which are based on the principles that secondhand smoke kills, that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke, and that all people –  especially workers - deserve to be protected from secondhand smoke.

Global Tobacco Treaty Takes Effect February 27th, TEAN Calls for Speedier Ratification by Slowcoach Uganda

THE FCTC

On February 27 2005, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), the World Health Organization’s (WHO) global treaty, will become international law. TEAN (The Environmental Action Network) applauds the 55 countries that have ratified this important treaty and thereby taken a major step forward in the worldwide battle against the death and disease caused by the tobacco epidemic, our planet’s second major cause of death. This groundbreaking, legally binding treaty provides tools for countries to enact comprehensive tobacco control legislation to take on the powerful tobacco industry, and its deceptions and slick marketing.

UGANDA – SLOWEST IN EAST AFRICA – MUST RATIFY URGENTLY

TEAN calls on the Ugandan Government to immediately ratify and implement the treaty thereby protecting our citizens and our country from the devastating health and economic impacts of tobacco. While Kenya ratified 9 months ago, and Tanzania has enabling legislation at an advanced stage, slow-coach Uganda’s Ministry of Health is still “consulting” other ministries.

HISTORIC MOMENT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH

The FCTC’s entry into force is historic global public health, requiring ratifying nations to adopt policies proven to reduce smoking and save lives such as: a comprehensive ban on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and large, visually striking health warning labels that cover at least 30 percent of cigarette packs. Uganda’s weak, text-only warnings, cover around 4% of a pack!

The treaty also provides nations with a roadmap for carrying forward strong, science-based policies in other areas, including protection from secondhand smoke, increased tobacco taxation, and measures to fight cigarette smuggling.

TOBACCO AND DEATH

Globally, WHO estimates that around 5 million people die each year from tobacco use. If current trends continue, this figure will reach 10 million per year by 2030, with 70 percent of deaths in developing countries like Uganda. While the measures in the FCTC represent a minimum set of tobacco control policies, the treaty encourages countries to do more. Strong action will give them the opportunity to reduce human suffering caused by tobacco and decrease the huge costs of tobacco-related health care.