The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

COP7 decisions: an overview

FCA identified three interlinked implementation-related priorities for COP7 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC):

FCTC COP7: Parties outline a path toward saving more lives

NEW DELHI, 12 November 2016 – Parties to the global tobacco control treaty now possess the outline of a path toward faster implementation at country level of the lifesaving measures in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control*, despite mixed results from six days of negotiations.

ASEAN tobacco control atlas released

 

ASEAN Tobacco Control AtlasSmokers in the South-East Asian region (ASEAN) start smoking on average before they are 20, the latest Tobacco Control Atlas has found.

UPDATE 2: 2014 tobacco control ‘hotspots’

Dortmund Kills victory 280214Below is our latest update of some of the ‘hot spots’ in global tobacco control that FCA is watching in 2014. 

Many of them concern challenges from the tobacco industry to governments’ attempts to protect public health by implementing tobacco control measures. These occur at the national level (in courts) as well as in the international arena.

UPDATED: 2014 tobacco control ‘hotspots’

Thai youth protest tobacco industry interference.Below is a recent update of some of the ‘hot spots’ in global tobacco control that FCA is watching in 2014. 

Many of them concern challenges from the tobacco industry to governments’ attempts to protect public health by implementing tobacco control measures. These occur at the national level (in courts) as well as in the international arena.

Tobacco farmers switching to alternatives


Throughout the world, tobacco farmers are beginning to switch to growing food or higher yielding crops, like bamboo.


After years of escalating health and environmental problems, low profits and the possibility of declining global demand for tobacco, these farmers realise that growing tobacco has put them in a ‘no-win’ situation.

The campaign Unfairtobacco.org interviewed experts from Bangladesh, Kenya and Brazil during last year's Week of Alternative Livelihoods, to show how farmers in these countries are switching from growing tobacco to alternative crops. Watch the video interviews above and below.

Cigarette butt waste needs global attention


Among other important obligations under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), Article 18 obligates Parties to protect the environment and people’s health in relation to agriculture and manufacturing of tobacco products within their countries.

In addition, the environmental impacts of cigarette butt waste are increasingly being recognised as needing global attention.

Industry’s dire warnings deconstructed


by Grieve Chelwa, PhD Candidate, University of Cape Town

In late October 2012, a study conducted by NKC Independent Economists was released that attempts to measure the primary elements of the tobacco value chain in 15 African countries that are part of the COME SA/SADC /SACU * regional blocs. The study was commissioned by the Tobacco Institute of Southern Africa (TISA), a body representing the tobacco industry in the region.

The study’s release coincides with the Fifth Conference of Parties (COP 5) in South Korea and is most likely meant to influence deliberations around Articles 17 and 18 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). Articles 17 and 18 speak to issues of alternative livelihoods and the protection of the health of workers engaged in the growing and processing of tobacco.

The aim of this short write-up is to critically engage with some of the findings of the TISA study, as well as to question the methods used by the study.