The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

FCA calls on ILO to cut ties with Tobacco Industry

The Framework Convention Alliance (FCA) joins the calls on the International Labour Organization (ILO) to end its cooperation with the tobacco industry. The FCA is amongst the initial signers of an open letter to the members of the ILO Governing Body that are due to vote on the matter during their meeting in Geneva from 26 October – 9 November 2017. The ILO is one of the last UN agencies to follow the recommendation of the UN inter Agency Task Force (UNIATF) to refuse in form of collaboration with the tobacco industry. On its date of publication (16 October), more than 180 organisation had signed the open letter to the ILO.

 

Statement by the Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

The global tobacco control community remains deeply concerned by the creation of the so-called “Foundation for a Smoke-Free World”, funded exclusively by the multinational tobacco company, Philip Morris International (PMI).

In its 14 Oct. issue, The Lancet published four pieces on the Foundation, including one by its head, Derek Yach.“The articles in the most recent issue of The Lancet have, if anything, raised our level of alarm,” said Francis Thompson, Executive Director of the Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control (FCA). The FCA is a global alliance of nearly 500 member organisations in more than 100 countries.

FCA notes that there is a long and tragic history of tobacco companies funding questionable research to delay effective measures to reduce deaths from smoking. Aware of their lack of credibility on health, Philip Morris and other tobacco companies also have a lengthy track record of paying third parties to advance their arguments and providing funds for what they describe as independent research efforts.

Plain packs proliferating

Global map of tobacco plain packaging, 2017

Plain packaging has been adopted in 8 countries and is under consideration in at least 15 other jurisdictions, a major increase from less than one year ago.

On 1 July, Norway joined Australia, France and the UK as countries that have implemented plain packs. Hungary, Ireland, New Zealand and Slovenia have all set dates for the measure, starting with Ireland on 30 Sep 2017.

Wanted: Communications superstar!

FCA is hiring a Communications Manager. Could it be you?

TobaccoUnmasked at Sri Lanka observatory

CCT Director Mahesh RajasuriyaThe information portal for the newest tobacco control observatory, designed to inquire into and document tobacco industry interference in public health policy-making, opened in July in Sri Lanka. TobaccoUnmasked (tobaccounmasked.lk) is part of the Centre for Combating Tobacco (CCT), which opened in 2016 at the University of Colombo, in Sri Lanka. We spoke to the CCT’s Director, Dr Mahesh Rajasuriya.

ECOSOC resolution challenges tobacco lobby

At first glance, tobacco control is one of the most successful fields in public health policy. Since 2003 there has been a unique international treaty, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which has been embraced by almost every UN member state, and the dangers of smoking are undisputed.

Smokefree England: lessons learned over 10 years

Graphic showing public support for smokefree


By Deborah Arnott*

Like a lot of students I worked in a bar to help pay my rent. Not a bad job, it fitted in with my studies and was flexible. But what I didn’t like was getting home gone midnight, exhausted, with my hair and clothes stinking of tobacco smoke. I’d wake up the next morning and my sheets would smell of it too.

So years later, when I was recruited by ASH with the primary aim of getting legislation to prohibit smoking in enclosed public places, I wanted to make sure pubs, bars and clubs were included.

Civil society shaping tobacco control in the Caribbean

The cover photo of the Caribbean reportAround the world the challenges faced by tobacco control advocates are similar: accessing funding and other resources, influencing policy makers, the tobacco industry, the tobacco industry and the tobacco industry.

This is why it’s always useful to learn about routes that colleagues have taken to overcome these barriers. The Jamaica Coalition for Tobacco Control (JCTC) and the Healthy Caribbean Coalition (HCC) have recently published a document full of such experiences and advice, designed to assist those working in tobacco control and in the broader fight against non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Smoking can increase risks caused by asbestos exposure

Graphic showing how mesothelioma affects lungs. 

By Emily Walsh*

Tobacco use is known to cause several illnesses, including various forms of cancer. The most common and well-known is lung cancer; however smoking tobacco can also lead to dangerous interactions with other toxins that can harm the lungs, like asbestos. Through dual exposure, this can lead to increased risk of developing serious health conditions.

Tobacco use in Africa still seen as health issue only – AFRO Coordinator

Tih Ntiabang, centre, during the debate on World No Tobacco Day.FCA’s AFRO regional coordinator, Tih Ntiabang, joined several public health organisations on World No Tobacco Day in calling on the European Parliament to scale up implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) globally as a way to ensure the success of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development.