The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

Congratulations WNTD Award winners!

FCA members are among those honoured with World No Tobacco Day Awards this year.

We congratulate all those who received awards in recognition of their achievements in tobacco control, in particular the following:

World No Tobacco Day 2015

See some of the WNTD activities from our members globally:

This year's World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) theme is Stop Illicit Trade of Tobacco Products.

According to the World Health Organization, one in every 10 cigarettes, and many other tobacco products, consumed worldwide are illegal, making the illicit trade of tobacco products a major global concern from many perspectives, including health, legal, economic, governance and corruption.

Fact Sheet: Costing action, and inaction, on tobacco control

An effective strategy to get the attention of all units of a government is to calculate the cost to the economy associated with the tobacco epidemic and compare this figure with the cost of implementing policies and programmes to address it.

FCA staff at the 16th WCTOH

WCTOH logoMany FCA staff and board members were in Abu Dhabi for the 16th World Conference on Tobacco or Health (WCTOH), 17-21 March 2015.

See some of their presentations below

The WHO FCTC at 10: more advocacy is needed

By E Ulysses Dorotheo, FCTC Program Director, Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance and Chair, FCA Board of Directors

It's true that the FCTC has accelerated progress in tobacco control in many countries, but in low- and middle-income countries, the tobacco industry continues to flourish and make obscene profits at the expense of public health, even as tobacco company executives and lawyers continue to spread misinformation about tobacco production, tobacco use, and tobacco control.

The WHO FCTC at 10: more political will needed

Matthew L MyersMatthew L. Myers, President
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
*

A decade after the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) came into force there is no doubt that the treaty has served as a catalyst for life-saving progress around the world. In 2006, the WHO projected that unless nations act decisively, tobacco will kill one billion people worldwide this century. Today, thanks in large part to the FCTC, actions taken since then have already begun to bend that arc. For the first time in decades, the total number of cigarettes sold worldwide actually declined in 2013.

The WHO FCTC at 10: progress has been mixed

Derek YachBy Derek Yach
Executive Director, Vitality Institute; former Executive Director, WHO NCDs*

The FCTC is an ambitious approach to tackling the world’s most preventable health problem. It was built on solid evidence of what worked best and supported strongly by the IMF, the World Bank, UNICEF, leading pharmaceutical companies and international health NGOs.

Progress has been mixed and the early passion and cohesion of the coalition has dissipated.

The WHO FCTC at 10: making a very big difference

Dr Judith MackayDr Judith Mackay
Senior Policy Advisor, WHO
Policy Advisor, World Lung Foundation/ Bloomberg
Initiative *

Along with the late Ruth Roemer and Allyn Taylor, I was privileged to be part of the birth of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) in 1993, when the idea of a Convention was thought to be an impossible dream.

FCA and global tobacco control in 2015

FCA Policy Director Francis ThompsonFrancis Thompson
FCA Policy Director<

With the adoption of Article 6 guidelines at COP6, we now have guidelines for all the demand-side articles of the FCTC. As a result, guidelines work is unlikely to be the main focus of the next few COP sessions. Rather, we expect a focus on implementation issues.