The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

Australia ranks first with labelling

canadian society reportMore than 60 countries now require graphic cigarette package warnings with Australia ranking the highest in terms of progress on labelling, an international report by the Canadian Cancer Society found.

The report ranks 198 countries and territories on the size of their health warnings on cigarette packages, and was released today at the fifth session of the Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) being held in Seoul, South Korea from November 12 to 17.

Sri Lanka adopts huge picture warnings


SriLanka warningsSri Lanka has passed regulations that mandate some of the largest picture warnings on cigarette packs in the world.

The warnings will cover 80 per cent of the front and back of packages; the text portion of the warning will be in three languages - Sinhala, Tamil and English.

The regulations also ban the use of misleading descriptions, including 'light', 'mild' 'low', 'extra' and 'ultra'.

Once implemented, Sri Lanka will have among the largest cigarette health warnings in the world, along with Australia at 82.5 percent (75 percent front, 90 percent back), and Uruguay at 80 percent (80 percent front and back).

Australia defeats Big Tobacco's challenge!


Eg of Aus plain packaging 200411Example of Australia's plain packaging (c) Gov. of AustraliaAustralia's High Court on Wednesday rejected a challenge by the tobacco industry of a new law on plain packaging of cigarettes.

The decision means that as of 1 December 2012 all tobacco sold in the country will be in the same colour packages, without logos or other brand markings.

“This is a important victory for global tobacco control,” said FCA Director Laurent Huber.

Brunei boosts warnings and non-smoking areas


Brunei’s Government has announced it will increase the size of health warnings on cigarette packages so that they cover 75 percent of the package area instead of 50 percent. It will also expand the country’s non-smoking areas.

Gulf countries adopt graphic warnings

Gulf warningsOne of the new graphic warnings From April, six Gulf countries will display graphic warnings on tobacco packages illustrating the effects of smoking cigarettes and shisha.

Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates are members of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Standardisation Organization (GSO), which adopted the labelling standard on 9 August 2011.

Madagascar gets graphic warning labels

Madagascar has become the third country in Africa and at least the 46th country/ jurisdiction in the world to require picture-based health warnings for tobacco packages.

The Interministerial Decision was approved on 30 September 2011. It will require picture health warnings on packages of cigarettes and some other tobacco products. The warnings will have to cover 65 percent of the front and back of packages, with the picture on the front and a text message on the back.

Two EU countries finalise health warnings

ireland warnings 170112

One of the graphic warnings to be included on tobacco packages in Ireland. (c) Government of Ireland.

 

Ireland is set to become the ninth European Union country to require picture warnings on tobacco packages, on 1 February 2013. It will follow Hungary, which recently announced its warnings will come into force on 1 September 2012.

The text in Ireland's warnings will be in both English and Irish.

Australia approves plain packaging!

An example of Australia's plain packaging. (c) Government of Australia. The Australian Parliament on Monday passed legislation that will make that country the first in the world to require plain packaging of tobacco products.

“Today, one of the most momentous public health measures in Australia’s history has been delivered by the Australian Parliament — legislation requiring the plain packaging of tobacco products,” said Health Minister Nicola Roxon.

“Plain packaging means that the glamour is gone from smoking and cigarettes are now exposed for what they are: killer products that destroy thousands of Australian families," she added.

Nepal tobacco package warnings lead Asia

A volunteer from Nepal's Resource Centre for Primary Health Care (RECPHEC) attempts to educate a smoker in Lalitpur city about the country's new tobacco control law. © RECPHEC

Nepal now has some of the largest graphic warnings on tobacco packages in the world, including on smokeless tobacco packages.

The government of the South Asian country passed its tobacco control legislation in May 2011. It includes a ban on smoking in public places and graphic warnings covering 75 per cent of each side of cigarette packages and the packages of other tobacco products.

The other products include gutkha ( a sweetened mixture of chewing tobacco, betel nut and palm nut), khaini (chewing tobacco) and surti (tobacco leaves).