The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

FCA staff at the 16th WCTOH

WCTOH logoMany FCA staff and board members were in Abu Dhabi for the 16th World Conference on Tobacco or Health (WCTOH), 17-21 March 2015.

See some of their presentations below

Talks on financing for NCDs should include the FCTC

It is now apparent that progress on tackling non-communicable diseases (NCDs*) has been insufficient and uneven. Countries are only slowly moving from their commitments toward action, including allocating resources.

So when the World Health Organization announced plans to set up a working group on financing for NCDs, expectations soared. After two high-level United Nations meetings on NCDs, it was thought that smaller group discussions could generate some progress.

The WHO FCTC at 10: more advocacy is needed

By E Ulysses Dorotheo, FCTC Program Director, Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance and Chair, FCA Board of Directors

It's true that the FCTC has accelerated progress in tobacco control in many countries, but in low- and middle-income countries, the tobacco industry continues to flourish and make obscene profits at the expense of public health, even as tobacco company executives and lawyers continue to spread misinformation about tobacco production, tobacco use, and tobacco control.

The WHO FCTC at 10: more political will needed

Matthew L MyersMatthew L. Myers, President
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
*

A decade after the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) came into force there is no doubt that the treaty has served as a catalyst for life-saving progress around the world. In 2006, the WHO projected that unless nations act decisively, tobacco will kill one billion people worldwide this century. Today, thanks in large part to the FCTC, actions taken since then have already begun to bend that arc. For the first time in decades, the total number of cigarettes sold worldwide actually declined in 2013.

The WHO FCTC at 10: progress has been mixed

Derek YachBy Derek Yach
Executive Director, Vitality Institute; former Executive Director, WHO NCDs*

The FCTC is an ambitious approach to tackling the world’s most preventable health problem. It was built on solid evidence of what worked best and supported strongly by the IMF, the World Bank, UNICEF, leading pharmaceutical companies and international health NGOs.

Progress has been mixed and the early passion and cohesion of the coalition has dissipated.

The WHO FCTC at 10: making a very big difference

Dr Judith MackayDr Judith Mackay
Senior Policy Advisor, WHO
Policy Advisor, World Lung Foundation/ Bloomberg
Initiative *

Along with the late Ruth Roemer and Allyn Taylor, I was privileged to be part of the birth of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) in 1993, when the idea of a Convention was thought to be an impossible dream.

FCA and global tobacco control in 2015

FCA Policy Director Francis ThompsonFrancis Thompson
FCA Policy Director<

With the adoption of Article 6 guidelines at COP6, we now have guidelines for all the demand-side articles of the FCTC. As a result, guidelines work is unlikely to be the main focus of the next few COP sessions. Rather, we expect a focus on implementation issues.

The FCTC in 2025: what needs to happen in the next decade?

By Framework Convention Alliance

It may be helpful to imagine the FCTC as a rapidly growing child. It came into the world 10 years ago, kicking and screaming but with some promising DNA: the various articles of the Convention.

The FCTC is 10: should we celebrate?

WHO Director-General Margaret Chan

February 27 will mark the 10th anniversary of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), the first global public health treaty.

Today the FCTC has 180 Parties, making it among the most widely-adopted international instruments. About 90 percent of the world’s population falls under the FCTC’s protections. The creators of the Convention were bold in their intentions – “to protect present and future generations from the devastating health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption.”

‘Hot spots’ FCA is watching this year

Global tobacco control hotspots, 2015Below we describe some of the ‘hot spots’ in global tobacco control that FCA will be watching in 2015. Please let us know about others, and about any developments concerning these issues.