The Framework Convention Alliance for Tobacco Control

Members contribute to FCA programmes

Framework Convention Alliance has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Action on Smoking and Health (ASH-US). ASH will continue supporting FCA programmes, and by extension the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), by the provision of resources to FCA.

FCA membership is free to its members, but the Alliance is dependent in part on contributions from member organisations like ASH.

We thank all members that have supported FCA's campaigns, and we encourage all of you to contribute in any way you can to strengthen the FCTC and its implementation.

Tobacco Control omitted from global development priorities

By Shana Narula
Program Consultant, ASH (US)

Who could not know about the harm caused by tobacco when we're celebrating World No Tobacco Day today, I thought as I prepared for an event at UN headquarters on May 31. But as I soon learned, I was wrong.

At the event, the release of the much-anticipated Report of the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, tobacco control was not even mentioned among the interventions proposed to address the world's development challenges. But isn't an epidemic that kills roughly 6 million people each year a serious problem, particularly if this number is predicted to rise to 8 million by 2030? 

Australia - again!

Once again Australia has demonstrated a truly global approach to tobacco control by making a financial contribution above and beyond the annual levy on Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC).

Australia's extra-budgetary contribution of A$985,000 will support the work programme agreed by the fifth session of the FCTC Conference of the Parties. This includes the intersessional group to complete draft guidelines on FCTC Article 6 (Price and tax measures to reduce the demand for tobacco) and technical and institutional activities to support the Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products.

FCA members vigilant on World No Tobacco Day

FCA members globally marked World No Tobacco Day with an array of activities, as you'll see in the photo slideshow below. But they also had to respond to the tobacco industry's attempt to subvert the Day's theme: Ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.


(Click on an image to see its caption)

Ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) was the theme of the World Health Organization’s WNTD 2013. TAPS drives the industry’s marketing, which constantly aims at hooking a new generation of smokers to replace the roughly six million people who die each year from tobacco use.

In Jamaica, The Heart Foundation of Jamaica/Jamaica Coalition for Tobacco Control spent WNTD responding to a press release from local tobacco company Carreras Ltd.

'FCAers' fêted on World No Tobacco Day

We congratulate all those working in global tobacco control who were recognised with World No Tobacco Day awards for 2013.

Winners of the World Health Organization's award included the following FCA staff and members:

Will Ireland overtake UK in tobacco control?

The UK could be about to lose its top ranking for tobacco control measures in Europe as Ireland steals the limelight following its decision to proceed with standardised packaging for tobacco. 

In a press release for World No Tobacco Day (31 May), FCA member ASH predicts that unless the UK decides to proceed with standard packs, Ireland will replace it as #1 in tobacco control among the 27 EU member states.

"The UK had the chance to become the second country in the world to introduce standard tobacco packaging but is now lagging behind as Ireland takes the lead," said ASH Chief Executive, Deborah Arnott.

Ireland prepares for plain packs

On 28 May the Irish Minister for Health announced that the Government’s Cabinet had approved the drafting of legislation for generic packaging.

The Minister for Health said he wants legislation drafted and prepared later this year, which he hopes will be enacted early in 2014.

Ireland would be the second country in the world, after Australia, to require tobacco to be sold in plain packages - free of manufacturers’ logos, colours and other brand imagery, and dominated by graphic health warnings. New Zealand has also announced it will follow Australia’s lead.

WNTD 2013 Reports

View reports relating to World No Tobaccco Day 2013 and its theme: Ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS).

Status of implementation of WHO FCTC Article 13 (banning tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship) in the South-East Asian region. (Report by Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance, SEATCA)

This publication provides the implementation status of the WHO FCTC Article 13 in the ASEAN region. See how your country fares, and take action now!

Download the full report.

WNTD Advocacy Tools

Help yourself to the various World No Tobacco Day 2013 advocacy tools on offer:

* Why ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship? (FCA fact sheet)

It is clear that in countries with weak regulation, tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship reach a very high proportion of people. For example according to the 2011 National Adult Tobacco Survey of Cambodia, 80 percent of respondents had seen tobacco advertising in the past months.

Download the factsheet in:


* Lessons learned and best practices in banning tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship
(FCA fact sheet)

Partial  bans  will  simply  result  in  the  tobacco  industry  shifting resources  to  non-banned  TAPS.  Adopt a comprehensive  ban  on all  direct and indirect forms of tobacco advertising,  promotion  and sponsorship.

 Download the factsheet in:


* Tobacco industry relentlessly undermining advertising bans 
('Swiss cheese' press release for your use)

Fill in the highlighted sections with your information and send the press release to local and national media

 Download and adapt the press release in:


* Tobacco company corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes
(Factsheet by Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids)

Article 13 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) requires Parties to implement and enforce a comprehensive ban on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, including a complete ban on corporate social responsibility (CSR). While tobacco companies claim to engage in CSR activities to be good corporate citizens, the true goals of industry-sponsored programs are to boost profits, build goodwill with policymakers and the public, counter negative attention surrounding its deadly products, and defuse opposition from tobacco control advocates.

Download the factsheet in:


* Status of implementation of WHO FCTC Article 13 (banning tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship) in the South-East Asian region.
(Report by Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance, SEATCA)

This publication provides the implementation status of the WHO FCTC Article 13 in the ASEAN region. See how your country fares, and take action now! Download the full report.


* Advertising at point-of-sale gone berserk
(Report by SEATCA).
With tobacco advertising and promotions either totally or partially banned in the mass media in almost all countries in Southeast Asia, the tobacco industry has shifted its focus to marketing at point-of-sale (check-out counters) by displaying cigarette packs or cartons. Download the full report


* ITC Brazil Report on TAPS (tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship)
. By The ITC Project.

The Report finds that incomplete and poorly enforced bans on TAPS mean that nearly a quarter of Brazilians still see marketing messages from tobacco companies at point-of-sale (PoS) displays, through corporate social responsibility initiatives run by the industry, on tobacco product packaging and in TV shows and films. Download the report.


*
WHO's WNTD 2013 web page

New Kosovo law combats tobacco industry interference


On 26 April, the President of Kosovo signed a comprehensive tobacco control law that includes the strongest protections in the world to date against tobacco industry interference in policy-making. Those measures are based on Article 5.3 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

The law incorporates nearly all measures in Guidelines to implementing FCTC Art 5.3. They apply to the whole of government and will be enforced by the national Anti-Corruption Agency. The measures include: