Getting started

11 May 2018

The login page for you website is at http://fctc.wpengine.com/wp-admin/
If you have forgotten your password, go to http://fctc.wpengine.com/wp-login.php?action=lostpassword and follow the instructions. Please note that these are the development URL and will change when the site launches.

When you’re logged in, the first thing you will see is the Dashboard – this is a summary page for your WordPress installation. It can be customised, but by default it should show things like Recent Activity, and WordPress News.

The most important part of the user interface (UI) is the bar on the left. This is the main navigation for the WordPress back-end. It has a list of several sections, beginning with the types of content on your website:

  • Posts
  • Pages

It then has links to WordPress settings, Appearance options, User settings, and custom plugin options. Be careful with changing settings – if you’re not 100% sure what something does, it may be best to leave it alone. Editing content is a lot more flexible and forgiving, there is very little you can ‘break’ just by editing content.

Users

Users are people who have access to the back-end or admin part of your website. If you do not see a specific option, bear in mind that only users who have a role of Administrator can change important settings. Users who are Editors can usually only edit content. This control is set up in Users, where new users can be added, and existing users can have their role changed, password changed, etc.

Types of content (post types)

It is important to have a good understanding of the available content types in your WordPress before making changes, or more crucially when adding new content. Almost every WordPress site we make has its own bespoke set of content types (or in WordPress lingo – post types). The main default content types are Posts and Pages. The difference is sometimes a bit tricky to understand, aside from the name, but Pages are usually ‘static’ types of content that are are individual stand-alone resources, they do not usually share common data. General articles about your organisation will usually be set up as Pages. On the other hand, Posts are more flexible, but generally used for things like Blog pages and News items. Posts can also be highly customised, and may have much more going on than just an article of text. Posts can also have Tags and Categories – these are a type of Taxonomy, which is a fancy name for classification, or categorisation.

In addition to Posts and Pages, your website may have custom post types set up. These are even more customised versions of Posts, so customised they have their own name and rules. They have different fields (places to add data) and are being used in specific and unique ways.

Please note that the content types do not necessarily correspond exactly with the front-end navigation, i.e. posts of the same type may be output in different sections of your site on the front-end.

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